Hill Street Baptist Church Presents Check to Isaac Dixon School

Hill Street Baptist Church recently presented a check in the amount $1,000 to Isaac Dixon Elementary School to cover the cost of hot lunches for children in poverty.

Check presentation by Hill Street Baptist Church member Annamaria Jackson (left), to Isaac Dixon School Principal Brad Johnson and Isaac Dixon Cafeteria Manager Pearl Lee, by Hill Street Baptist Church member Pamela Camp, and Rev. Dr. Keith A. Ogden, Pastor of Hill Street Baptist Church.   Photo: HSBC Media Ministry

Check presentation by Hill Street Baptist Church member Annamaria Jackson (left), to Isaac Dixon School Principal Brad Johnson and Isaac Dixon Cafeteria Manager Pearl Lee, by Hill Street Baptist Church member Pamela Camp, and Rev. Dr. Keith A. Ogden, Pastor of Hill Street Baptist Church. Photo: HSBC Media Ministry

The church’s goal is to ensure that every child has equal access to a hot lunch at Isaac Dixon Elementary School.

In the gospel of Matthew around the 35th verse, Jesus said, “For I was hungry, and you gave me something to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me something to drink; I was a stranger, and you invited me in.”

This donation was inspired by servants of the Hill Street Church in the persons of Mrs. Pamela Camp and Ms. Annamaria Jackson who, in a matter of days, raised $877; they thought it appropriate to inquire at Isaac Dixon to ensure an incident like the story which follows never happens in our backyard. Pam and Annamaria were moved with compassion as they saw the headline news story of Stacy Koltiska, a cafeteria worker who quit her job after being forced to refuse a hot meal to a poor student.

“As a Christian, I have an issue with this,” said Koltiska, of Canonsburg, Pa. “It’s sinful and shameful is what it is.”

Rather than continue to enforce the policy at Wylandville Elementary School in Eighty Four, Pa., Koltiska tendered her resignation last week. Koltiska said in an interview that she had worked for the school district for two years. She said she was stunned by the new policy, which began this fall.

Students who were refused the hot meal instead got a sandwich made of two slices of wheat bread and a single, cold slice of “government cheese,” Koltiska said. The contents of the hot lunch, such as chicken nuggets or corn dog bites, were thrown away, Koltiska said, even though parents would still be charged the full regular price of $2.05 for the meal. Koltiska said that she resigned out of a moral obligation.

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